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Title I do promise to bear faith and true allegiance to His Majesty King George the third [manuscript]: Menaguashe near Fort Howe [Saint John, N.B.], 1778 Sept. 24
Author Micmac Tribe
Date
Document Type Manuscript; Tribe Record
Description From the Newberry Library Catalogue: Contemporary copy of the Sept. 24, 1778, oath of allegiance to King George III taken by forty-one representatives of the Micmac Tribe at Mengou├Ęche near Fort Howe (now Saint John, N.B.). The Micmacs promised to inform the British of American rebel activities, to protect Bourg and Francklin, to remain neutral in the conflict, and to have no contact with rebel-supporting Malecites in Machias. Appended is a list giving the names, titles, and residences of the Micmac Indians who took the oath.
Names Francklin, Michael (1733-1782); Francklin, Michael (1733-1782)
Places Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
Keywords US War of Independence, war, warfare, British Colonialism, British North America, government, government relations, revolution, contract
Theme American Indians and the European Powers; Military Encounters: Conflicts, Rebellions and Alliances; First Nations of Canada
Tribe / Nation
Culture Area Northeast
Additional Information During the American Revolution the governments of Nova Scotia and Massachusetts competed for control of the region that is now New Brunswick and Maine, and for the allegiance of the Malecite, Micmac, and Penobscot Indians residing there. In response to Malecite support of the Americans, who in 1777 established themselves on the Saint John River near Fredericton, the British built Fort Howe near the mouth of the same river. On Sept. 24, 1778, British representatives (Michael Francklin, superintendent of Indian affairs, Joseph-Mathurin Bourg, missionary priest, and William Studholme, commander of Fort Howe) met with the Micmacs and with the Malecites who had not fled to Machias, Maine. There the Indians took an oath of allegiance to the King and signed a treaty promising to remain neutral and to report rebel activities.
Library The Newberry Library
Copyright The Newberry Library
Collection The Edward E. Ayer Collection
Reference VAULT box Ayer MS 3134
Catalogue Link The Newberry Library Catalogue