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Title The following is a true relation of ye long sufferings of Godfrey Harding and Florence Eggin and two others being taken prisoners by the French in 1739/40 [manuscript]…
Author Eggin, Florence
Date
Document Type Manuscript
Description From the Newberry Library Catalogue: Detailed memorial, Dec. 25, 1746, by Eggin and Harding, addressed to "Worthy and Hon. Gentlemen," regarding the circumstances of their long imprisonment at Brest and their hopes of release. The memorialists discuss their presence in the Chickasaw country, participation in the Feb. 1739/40 French attack on the tribe’s fort, and treatment by the French. The document, transcribed by an unknown third party, is signed with the marks of Eggin and Harding.
Names Harding, Godfrey; Le Moyne, Jean Baptiste, sieur de Bienville (1680-1767)
Places Mississippi, French Louisiana, United States; Brest, France
Keywords War of the Austrian Succession, prison, war, captive, captivity, trade, battle, attack, army, armed forces
Theme American Indians and the European Powers; Military Encounters: Conflicts, Rebellions and Alliances
Tribe / Nation
Culture Area Southeast
Additional Information

FULL TITLE: The following is a true relation of ye long sufferings of Godfrey Harding and Florence Eggin and two others being taken prisoners by the French in 1739/40 [manuscript]: theire maner [sic] of being taken the usage they receid [sic]. and thier [sic] long confinement viz: Prison Royal, Brest, [France], 1746 Dec. 25

Indian trader, who together with Godfrey Harding received a license in August of 1739 from South Carolina governor William Bull to trade with the Chickasaw Indians. Complying with instructions from Charleston, the traders had assisted and were with the Chickasaw during French Louisiana governor Bienville’s second campaign against the Chickasaw forts. Eggin and Harding later travelled to Bienville on the Mississippi in an attempt to regain horses lost in the attack. There, upon news of a formal declaration of war between Britain and France, they were detained and transported to a French prison in Brest, where they remained in 1746.

Library The Newberry Library
Copyright The Newberry Library
Collection The Edward E. Ayer Collection
Reference VAULT box Ayer MS 271
Catalogue Link The Newberry Library Catalogue